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Going green

  1. Veteran big game hunter dies after elephant, felled by gunfire, collapses on him

    Wildlife

    Theunis Botha led his first guided hunting safari through South Africa's grasslands in 1989. A college student at the time, he used the money he received to help put himself through school.

    Big game hunter Theunis Botha, shown here with elephant tusks, was killed during a hunt in west Zimbabwe.
  2. Startling video shows sea lion snatching girl from pier in British Columbia

    Wildlife

    RICHMOND, British Columbia — A college student has startling video of a sea lion snatching a girl off a dock and yanking her into the water on Canada's West Coast.

    A college student has startling video of a sea lion snatching a girl off a dock and yanking her into the water on Canada's West Coast. [Photo from video]
  3. Says Florida woman who hit 9-foot alligator on I-75, 'Are you kidding me?'

    Wildlife

    SARASOTA — A mother of four escaped serious injury when her SUV hit a 9-foot alligator crossing Interstate 75.

    Jennifer Rosinski's Ford Escape struck this alligator as it tried to run across Interstate 75 near North Port in Sarasota Couonty late on Tuesday. [Photo courtesy of Jennifer Rosinski via Palm Beach Post]
  4. The Avon Park wildfire we could smell from Tampa Bay now 50 percent contained

    Wildlife

    Folks who smelled smoke while leaving their homes in the immediate Tampa Bay area on Thursday shouldn't have been alarmed. There was no wildfire in their backyard.

    Clearwater Beach is lost in a smokey haze from a wildfire at the Avon Park bombing range Thursday morning. [JIM DAMASKE | TIMES]

  5. Egmont Key makes historic preservation list because it is threatened by climate change

    Environment

    ST. PETERSBURG — Every year the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation picks 11 properties to highlight as the most threatened historic properties in the state.

     Egmont Key off the coast of Fort DeSoto in Tampa Bay. Each year the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation picks 11 properties to highlight as the most threatened historic properties in the state.
This year, Egmont Key became the first property to make the list because authorities said it is threatened by climate change and rising seas. [MONICA HERNDON   |   Times]
  6. Want to bag a gator? The first chance to apply for a permit is underway

    Wildlife

    It's almost gator hunting season in Florida.

    An American alligator shows off its teeth as it basks in the sun in a South Florida wetlands area. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission has opened its first application period for permits for the annual alligator harvest. [SCOTT KEELER   |   Times]
  7. Red Tide linked to pelican deaths, but St. Petersburg still denies any link to sewage dumps

    Water

    ST. PETERSBURG

    Earlier this spring, a city-funded study concluded that dozens of pelicans found dead in January had been exposed to botulism while feasting on tilapia carcasses.

    Dozens of pelicans turned up dead last fall in Coffee Pot Bayou and Riviera Bay. [Photo submitted by Leo McFee (October 2016)]
  8. Tampa Bay has spent millions to keep hurricane season from turning into sewage season again

    Environment

    Hurricane season starts next month. Will it also be the start of sewage season?

    St. Petersburg is drilling 24 hours a day on a well that will give the sewage system an extra 15 million gallons of capacity.
  9. 'You are paddle-boarding next to approximately 15 great white sharks,' chopper tells California beachgoers (w/video)

    Wildlife

    "You are paddle-boarding next to approximately 15 great white sharks," Deputy Brian Stockbridge announced via a loudspeaker.

    A bird flies over a swimming in the water off Capo Beach in Dana Point, Calif., Thursday, May 11, 2017. Advisories were posted for beaches up and down Southern California after shark sightings this week. [Jeff Gritchen | The Orange County Register via AP]
  10. Here's video of a guy named 'The Wildman' catching a nearly 17-foot-long pregnant python in the Everglades

    Wildlife

    A man pulled a pregnant python out of the Everglades earlier this week that was nearly 17 feet long.

    Dusty "The Wildman" Crumm caught a nearly 17 foot long python in the Everglades this month.